Choosing a Flute that’s right for you

Flutes are an extremely popular choice for children looking to start a musical instrument for the first time The number 1 rule in buying a musical instrument is talk to your teacher first.  There are a number of different models of flute, and your teacher will help you choose the right one for you.  Your teacher will also advise you on the best brands.

 

The different kinds of flutes

There are a number of different kinds of flute available on the market today. For advanced players there are options such as open hole and ‘B’ foot joints that increase the functions of a basic flute. There are a range of different materials used to make flutes but for most students, a metal flute is the most common

Most student flutes are made out of silver-plated metal such as yellow brass, which is 70% copper and 30% zinc. Silver-plating gives the flute a more mellow sound. Most professionals play on solid silver flutes (silver content 92.5%) .

 

Do I need a Curved head Flute ?

Most flutes have a straight body with keys along the length and a mouthpiece towards the end. The difference with a curved head flute is that the head joint is bent back towards the tail of the flute. This helps younger students comfortable reach the keys with out stretching. Most of the curved head instgruments on the market today also include a straight head in the case. This makes it easy to transition to a straight head with an instrument that the young student is familiar with.

 

 

 

 

Common names in curved head flutes would include Martin and Trevor James. The Martin is a very affordable option and a high quality instrument. They are highly recommended by a lot of teachers.

 

 

http://www.wamusic.com.au/shop/martin-200t-curved-head-flute/

 

Trevor James make a high quality flute that has a tonal quality far superior to most student grad flutes.

 

Trevor James Flute with curved head joint

 

Slit E Flutes versus non split E

 

The most common question we get from customers is do I need a split e mechanism on my flute. A split E mechanism is not a necessary feature on a flute, however some teachers recommend them. It is best to talk to your teacher first.